Christmas Lunch Party

Sunday 9 December 2017

Photos by Bev and Karen

With the 2017 bushwalking year over, it was time to catch up with walking mates one last time at the Batemans Bay Bushwalkers Christmas Party – this year held at JJ’s at the Moorings, Tomakin.

Good weather saw us all out in the courtyard behind the venue, gathered around the spit roast in anticipation.  Several foundation members from the Club’s inception in 1985 still walk with us and came along to celebrate with ensuing generations and new members who joined us only this year.

Best wishes to everyone for a Merry Christmas and happy holiday season.  And looking forward to another big year of fun and adventure out in the bush.

Karen

Morning Walk from Mullimburra Point to Bingie

Thursday 30 November 2017

Photos by Karen M and Philip I

Bushwalking Leader Phillip I led a morning walk on a 6 km scenic circuit from Mullimburra Point to Bingie Point midweek.

The southbound track followed the Dreaming Track to Bingie Beach and then the beach to the headland where we paused for morning tea looking southwards to Tuross, Potato Point, Narooma with Mt Dromedary looming on the horizon.

The return leg followed the Dreaming Track north to Kellys Lake, then along beaches, with a final rock scramble to admire Cathedral Rock and emerge on Mullimburra Point.  We were lucky with the weather – not too hot for walking, but not too cold for a swim at Honeymoon Bay before heading home.

Karen M

Tomakin Circuit

Saturday 25 November 2017

Photos by Carol
We all know that we live in a special part of the world. The weather on 25 November reinforced that sentiment.
15 of us enjoyed an easy beach and river bank walk at Tomakin and a most pleasant morning tea, after which 13 survivors continued the circumambulation of the suburb, finishing the stroll along the length of Barlings Beach.
A beautiful morning.
Ian H

Paddle Camp at Bundeena Royal National Park

Sunday 19 to Friday 24 November 2017

Photos by Ian B

The Bundeena Paddle/Walk camp was very successful. Eleven members attended, 10 paddlers (who also walked), and one sole walker.

We camped in the Royal National Park at the lovely Bonnie Vale campground on the outskirts of Bundeena. It is on the Hacking River estuary, just across the water from Cronulla. The water barrier allowed us to relax and enjoy a wonderful campground well within the sights of the gaze of Sydney’s 4 million residents.

On the first day, on a high tide, we paddled the 12 km upstream from Bundeena to the Audley weir. We enjoyed bushland on the left, basically unchanged in two hundred years, and to the right, expensive houses in the suburbs of Lilli Pilli, Yowie Bay and Gymea Bay, all of which seemed to be perched on their own individual sandstone rock shelf.

On the second day we walked part of the Royal Coastal Walk from Wattamolla to Garies Beach. Spectacular sandstone clifflines overlooking the Pacific Ocean, dense heath on the hinterland, and rocky creeks that empty by waterfall directly into the ocean are features of this area.

We paddled again on the third day, this time by launching at Warumbul Picnic Area on the Hacking River and exploring the nearby Yowie Bay. Paddling among the jettys and luxury moored yachts and launches, we admired all the beautiful houses, each with its extensive water views overlooking equally expensive yachts. We wondered what sort of trade-in we might get for our kayaks.

It was back to walking the Royal Coastal Walk on the fourth day, this time from Wattamolla northward to Bundeena. We enjoyed more wonderful clifflines but a feature of this section was the colours, patterns and textures in the many different layers of sandstone revealed by eons of water and wind erosion. Nature’s artistry at its zenith.

On the final night we were too exhausted for a camp dinner so we dined at the local pizza and reflected on the last four days. It was a most enjoyable camp – a relaxed campground, (relatively) fine weather, great scenery, lots of exercise, and, of course, most agreeable company. What more could we want?

Ian B

Ironbark Range, East of Nelligen

Wednesday 22 November 2017

Photo by Bob T

With detailed precision, our leader Valerie placed the cars for the separate start & finish points, and we set off along old Sproxton Road.

Conversations soon ignited, with topics wide-ranging as usual, punctuated by observations of rare, unusual or feral plants.  Animals make themselves scarce, as the “many-footed mumble bug” creates a wave of chatter that warns them well in advance of us.

As we progressed over hill & dale, descriptions of the “ups” varied from “cheeky” to “serious” and one was labelled “obnoxious”.   Refreshed by drink stops as the day warmed, morning tea & lunch passed, and we were on the last leg along Old Nelligen Road, when a pleasant surprise met us.

Only a few days earlier Valerie had driven past the area, hoping to find a grove of Blueberry Ash in flower, but not so. However, this day we found them bursting their buds into the delicate pale flowers, which reminded us of ballerina skirts.

On returning to Valerie’s car, we soon enjoyed the “bush cuppa” Valerie had promised’ along with an array of cake & slices that Bev had made.   A delightful way to end a walk.

Bob T

Tracks and Mines near Moruya

Sunday 19 November 2017

Photos by Denise

For the third time this year, members of Narooma- Dalmeny and Batemans Bay Bushwalking Clubs  got together for a combined hike. A group of twenty walkers and one visitor explored an alluvial gold mining area behind Moruya township.

The first hurdle was to cross Candoin Creek as its water levels and flow rate had been increased by recent rain. Shoes and socks were taken off in an effort to preserve comfort and avoid slipping on large rocks.

Thence it was onward through open forest where the group enjoyed the sight of several Kurrajong trees in bloom whilst listening to birdsong and the sound of cicadas. Many relics of past mining activities soon became apparent, such as a stamp battery to crush ore, slag pits, large wheels, water pits and even a bush shack that boasted a BBQ and “dunny”  out the back.

Mining in the Eurobodalla commenced in 1831 and continued into the early 1900’s although interest and activities continued in the area explored by walkers for at least another fifty years, a fact to which the remnants of abandoned Chevrolet truck attest. It was a privilege to visit such an historically interesting region of our shire.

Denise S

Guerrilla Bay to Rosedale Cliffs, Bush and Beaches

Thursday 16 November 2017

Photos by Carol

This was a very scenic relaxing walk which began by visiting the WW2 gun emplacement on Burrewarra Headland and continuing on past the lighthouse with magnificent views south along the coastline and beyond to Mt Dromederry and the Deua National Park ranges.  Amongst this we saw a sea eagle soaring on the thermals as well as two yellow-tailed black cockatoos “talking” up in the Banksia trees.

Following morning tea at Guerilla Bay we headed off over the headlands to Nun’s Beach and Rosedale Beaches.  The lookout and the special access track for the disabled to Ronald MacDonald respite house were a credit to those who organised it.  Then it was along a slightly different track back to Guerilla Bay for lunch.

All agreed the day’s walk over and around the headlands and beaches taken at a relaxed pace, admiring our beautiful coastline was “a gem”.

Pat R

Maloneys to Square Head Circuit

Saturday 11 November 2017

Photos by Carol and Mary T

On Saturday November 11, we woke to a glorious day that provided perfect conditions for the above-mentioned walk. Only 19 people showed up, however, at the starting point in Maloneys Beach we were welcomed by a large number of kangaroos.

Mary led us across the beach towards Long Beach where we stopped for morning tea and snacks of course. Once rejuvenated, we proceeded up the hill into the surrounding forest. At 11 am precisely we stopped to honour our fallen soldiers with a minute of silence. During this minute we remembered them in our own way, whilst enjoying beautiful sounds of the bush. After taking a few photos of the picturesque surrounds, we proceeded on our walk and enjoyed the fresh air, beautiful scenery, glorious weather and chatting along with a fantastic group of people.

One cannot help but feel sorry for people who could not/did not come along for this walk.

We are all grateful to Mary for the effort and for sharing this lovely location with us.

Joe

Kioloa Coast, Mountain and Forest

Wednesday 8 November 2017

Photos by Brian, Carol, Denise and Mary T

Batemans Bay Bushwalkers headed north to Kioloa village mid week for further exploration of the walking tracks in the area.  Newly emerged cicadas were deafening as the group made its way through the forest and across the lower slopes of Durras Mountain, emerging at Pretty Beach.  The stretch of coast between Pretty Beach and Kioloa is dramatic with tall sheer cliffs and rock platforms and we lingered at the many viewpoints along the way.  We enjoyed watching a young yellow tail cockatoo practising his perching on a lone swaying twig, and came across a flowering native cymbidium snake orchid beside the track.  We surprised a couple of salt licking kangaroos on the rocks at O’Hara Head before settling down to watch the big swell crashing on the shore below at lunch.

After the heavy rains the coastal creeks had been flushed into the ocean and were now looking much healthier.  A very scenic 11 km circuit.

Karen M

The Lost World and Hidden Garden

Sunday 5 November 2017

Photos by Denise, Mary T and Paul

On Sunday 5th November 17 Batemans Bay bushwalkers tackled a remote forest area close to Conjola.  First of all we were treated to a smorgasbord of giant Birdnest ferns sitting on top of magnificent sandstone boulders. Exploring further into the dense forest one could truly believe you were in a lost world as we gazed in awe at gigantic figs reaching into the sky with age old roots cascading down their huge rock pedestals.

The wonder continued as we passed through  another forest of twisted and tangled vines eventually leading into a secret hanging garden of Birdnest ferns clinging to a solid cliff face.

On the return journey a very cleverly disguised detour was to reveal yet another forest of cabbage tree palms which included some magnificent specimens.

All in all a very spectacular walk which everyone thoroughly enjoyed.

Nancy